Cover Reveal: A Flash of Red

My debut novel, A Flash of Red, is a psychological thriller detailing the chaos that ensues when mental illness invades our most intimate relationships. It’s official release date from Pandamoon Publishing is Dec. 13 (on Amazon and Barnes & Noble), but I have a sneak preview of the cover now to share with you:

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What is A Flash of Red about?

Professor Anna Klein and her husband, Sean, are a young couple each struggling with their own misperceptions of reality.  While Anna’s daily anxieties turn on the axis of her mother’s path into psychosis, Sean escapes to the alternate reality of love and sex offered online. When Bard, a student of Anna’s, develops his own obsession with the couple, their already unsteady world collapses with irrevocable consequences. As focused on providing a driving plot as it is in presenting multi-faceted characters, A Flash of Red ultimately asks the question: What happens when we can no longer tell the difference between what we want and what is real?

 Intrigued? Want a preview? You can check out the first chapter here.

 

Mindsoak: A Healthy Student Body

My first feature for Mindsoak this November emerged from a phenomenon I encounter every semester around this time–weeks 12-13 in a 15-week semester:

Students flooding my office hours

For most of the semester, my office hours (where I am expected to be ‘in office’ to meet with students if they choose to stop by) are completely empty. But there is something about this time of the semester–many students are looking ahead towards finals week and their final grades, other students are considering whether they should late-drop a course before the deadline due to their performance so far–that propels students to seek out their professors for a one-on-one meeting.

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We are. . .

And, in my experience over the last 10 years of teaching in higher education here at Penn State, the vast majority of my meetings with students at this point involve me helping students connect with counselors and other mental health services because their symptoms of anxiety or depression (the two most common mental health issues my students describe coping with) have reemerged or worsened due to the academic stress brought on by the looming end of the semester. Alternately, I also regularly encounter students who have experienced some form of trauma during the semester which they have attempted to cope with on their own (sexual assaults being one common traumatic experience) but are now finding themselves unable to manage with the added pressures brought along with the end of the semester.

Just to be clear: These students are not meeting with me to seek out adjustments to their grades or extensions on assignment deadlines due to their struggles with mental and emotional health.

In my experience, these students are adamant about continuing to meet their academic responsibilities, but simply find themselves at a loss as to how to do so given their emotional burdens. In other words, they are coming to me and my colleagues for help.

But as I discuss in detail in my Mindsoak essay, the mental health care for students at Penn State and most other universities in our country is already stretched incredibly thin due to limited funds.

Where does that leave students and the faculty trying to support them? Read on to find out. . .

 

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